The Evolution of Sushi

As the Japanese continued to ingrain sushi into their culture, the process of making and serving it evolved along the way. In the early 17th century, Matsumoto Yoshiichi of Edo (now Tokyo) began to season the rice with rice wine vinegar and offered his ‘sushi’ for sale. This process enabled to the delicacy to be eaten immediately instead of having to wait the months that it had previously taken to normally prepare the sushi. Our understanding and appreciation of the special history of sushi is what makes Sapporo the best sushi restaurant in The Woodlands.

In the early 19th century, a novel concept and interesting variation of sushi was devised by a man named Hanaya Yohei. He believed that placing the fish on top of an oblong shaped piece of seasoned rice would increase the immediate flavor experience of the dish. We now call this style ‘nigri sushi’; also referred to as ‘finger sushi’ or ‘edomae sushi’. We embrace this method which is another reason that Sapporo is regarded as the best sushi restaurant in The Woodlands, and we commonly offer this mainstream way of indulging in Japanese sushi at our restaurants in Montgomery, Spring & The Woodlands.

The Evolution of Sushi

In the time of Hanaya Yohei, sushi restaurants were not common, but was commonly served from stalls in the streets throughout Japan. Sushi was thought to be a snack – or a quick ‘to-go’ bite. In essence, sushi was the first form of ‘fast-food’ in Japanese culture. This did not last, as sushi quickly became widely popular.

After the Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, many people lost their homes and businesses – forcing them to move from Tokyo. Post World War II, the sushi stalls were closed and moved off the streets and into brick-and-mortar buildings for better sanitary conditions. From there, more formal sitting areas were provided, which converted a once street-snack into a true dining experience. Some sushi restaurants in The Woodlands, such as Sapporo, have remembered this cultural shift and integrated the history of sushi into our dining culture.

Sushi rapidly spread around the globe and was quickly adopted by western cultures. Sushi became sophisticated and exclusive, which added to its perceived value and cultural appeal. Our sushi restaurant in The Woodlands & Magnolia embraces this cultural shift while seamlessly integrating this history of the delicacy.

Sushi rapidly spread around the globe and was quickly adopted by western cultures. Sushi became sophisticated and exclusive, which added to its perceived value and cultural appeal. Sapporo sushi restaurant in The Woodlands & Magnolia embraces this cultural shift while seamlessly integrating the beautiful history of the delicacy into our artisan inspired dishes.